Daring design alternatives and eye-catching extras rework a Midtown duplex

An outsized pendant in the eating area is from Arteriors. Drew and Janson commissioned the tailor made wooden table, and Shelby specified pottery from several artists to carry on the handmade glimpse.

Photograph by Christina Wedge

Wanting for clues about her new clientele, interior designer Shelby Adamson noticed some clever espresso-desk guides, a craftsman-constructed eating desk, and some Jonathan Adler add-ons in their Midtown home—all superior signs they have been on the similar webpage. “I quickly caught on to the actuality that they had a eager eye for superior-conclusion design and style, with a little bit of an edge,” she states. The newly married pair, Drew Standrod and Janson Morehead, confirmed they were all about including some wow factors and cited “West Coastline modern” as a guiding style—which was all music to Shelby’s ears. Their new white duplex was a blank slate, but the few experienced great art and light fixtures as a setting up stage.

Property owners (from left) Janson Morehead (a human-sources professional) and Drew Standrod (who operates in the tech sector) turned an unused bedroom into a multipurpose lounge room—grounding it in saturated shades and a beloved zebra photograph. Designer Shelby Adamson employed the linear pattern of zebra stripes as a jumping-off stage for just the suitable volume of pattern, adding striped components with the facet table and McGee & Co. rug. A sofa from CB2 is charcoal velvet.

Photograph by Christina Wedge

Touches of teal
“Drew and Janson required their home to be ‘a moment’, and I consider we obtained that,” states Shelby, whose firm’s identify is Tiny Black Fox. An unused reward home offered the opportunity to paint walls in high-gloss teal (“Pacific Sea Teal” by Benjamin Moore). “This coloration generates the fantastic place to sit, have a cocktail, and put on some vinyl. It’s daring, but quietly so,” the designer adds. Other vital functions consist of matching teal curtains and a personalized window seat, all maintaining the zebra art as the focal place.

Bold design choices and eye-catching accessories transform a Midtown duplex
Crisp white bedding with black trim from Restoration Components contrasts with black partitions in the key bedroom, even though a multicolored rug from Designer Rug Warehouse on the Westside ties everything with each other.

Photograph by Christina Wedge

Again to Black
“We wished to go daring in the primary bedroom, so we did so with some attractive artwork, and Sherwin Williams’ ‘Bohemian Black’ on the wall,” suggests the designer. “The house now feels complex and captivating.” Her assistance to everyone looking at a black bed room? Just do it. In this circumstance, white bedding with a black trim and a lighter rug vary the texture and distinction with the sultry walls. Continuing the concept, Shelby painted the kitchen island and hood black too.

Bold design choices and eye-catching accessories transform a Midtown duplex
Benjamin Moore’s “Rust” helps make a dynamic statement on the guest bedroom partitions and ceiling. Ceramic-and-textile wall artwork is by Brooklyn-primarily based Adelaide Veysseire. Chair is from Jayson Home, and lighting is Shades of Mild.

Photograph by Christina Wedge

Trust in Rust
To give new lifetime to a guest bed room with current furnishings, Shelby wrapped the home in a playful rust-orange stripe. A conceal rug and textural add-ons play up the earthy topic. As with other rooms, the couple needed extras and artwork to replicate their travels and interests. “One of their targets was to carry the essence of the boutique hotels they’ve frequented throughout the world, like the Chromata in Santorini, or the Zadun in Cabo, into their house,” states Shelby. “We wanted to capture that thought of every place reflecting the nearby taste along with substantial structure.”

This article appears in our Winter 2021 situation of Atlanta Magazine’s Home.